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Politics

US election 2020: Trump and Biden will speak hours apart at rallies in  Florida 

  • US election 2020: Trump and Biden will speak hours apart at rallies in  Florida 
    More than 75 million people have cast early in-person and mail ballots US election 2020: Trump and Biden will speak hours apart at rallies in  Florida 
Region:
United States
Category:
Politics
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On the campaign trail yesterday, Mr Trump urged states to shun lockdowns when tackling the pandemic.
Mr Biden - who has not ruled out further lockdowns - pledged instead to "let science drive our decisions".

President Donald Trump and Democratic rival Joe Biden will both rally supporters on Thursday in the critical battleground state of Florida, campaigning in the same city hours apart and putting on full display their differing approaches to the resurgent coronavirus pandemic, writes James Oliphant for Reuters.

Opinion polls show Biden with a significant edge nationally, but his lead is tighter in battleground states. A Reuters/Ipsos poll released on Wednesday showed Trump had essentially moved into a tie with Biden in Florida, with 49% saying they would vote for Biden and 47% for the president.

With its 29 electoral votes, the state is a major prize in next Tuesday’s election. Trump will stage an outdoor rally in Tampa. Biden, in contrast, will hold a drive-in rally.

In the Reuters/Ipsos poll in Florida, 48% of likely voters said Biden would be better at handling the pandemic, while 42% said Trump would be better. Some 52% said Trump would be better at managing the economy, against 41% for Biden.

More than 75 million people have cast early in-person and mail ballots, according to data compiled by the US Elections Project at the University of Florida. That is a record-setting pace and more than 53% of the total 2016 turnout.

Trump will likely be touting new government data on the nation’s gross domestic product during the third quarter which is expected later today. While the numbers are likely to show a record jump in growth as compared with the calamitous second quarter of the year, economists have cautioned that a recovery from the coronavirus hit is far from complete.