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Clinton, Trump claim big Super Tuesday victories

Region:
America
Category:
Politics
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Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton swept through the South on Super Tuesday, claiming victory in their parties' primaries in delegate-rich Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama and Virginia

Democrat Hillary Clinton has won seven states and Donald Trump at least seven in Super Tuesday elections, the biggest day of the primary campaign.

While there were bright spots for other candidates, the front-runners appeared ever more likely to end up in a
general election showdown.

Despite a healthy showing for her rival Bernie Sanders, Clinton began to turn some of her attention to Trump.

"It's clear tonight that the stakes in this election have never been higher and the rhetoric we're hearing on the other side has never been lower," she said in front of supporters in Miami.
"I am a unifier," Trump told reporters, dismissing concerns that his nomination would rip apart the party. "Once we get all this finished, I'm going after one person - Hillary Clinton."

He cast her as part of a political establishment that has failed Americans.

"She's been there for so long," Trump said. "If she hasn't straightened it out by now, she's not going to straighten it out in the next four years."

Trump won a close race in Vermont over John Kasich, but was denied a potential eighth win when Ted Cruz was projected as the winner of a close content in the Republican Alaska caucuses.

Trump also won in Virginia, Alabama, Massachusetts, Tennessee, Arkansas and Georgia.

Massachusetts was the last on the Democratic side to be projected for Clinton. In doing so, she captured all four of the most delegate-rich races on Tuesday, following victories in Georgia, Virginia, and above all, Texas, which comprises 252 delegates.

Clinton, the former senator and secretary of state and First Lady, also won in Arkansas — where her husband Bill was governor before going on to the U.S. presidency — as well as Alabama and Tennessee.

"America never stopped being great. We have to make America whole. We have to fill in what's been hollowed out," Clinton said.