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Britain's Labour Party elects left-wing new leader

Region:
Europe
Category:
Politics
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The Labour Party is Britain's largest opposition party. It announced the result of its leadership election on Saturday. Corbyn swept up about 60 percent of the votes to beat 3 other contenders

Members of Britain's Labour Party have elected veteran left-winger Jeremy Corbyn as their new leader.

The Labour Party is Britain's largest opposition party. It announced the result of its leadership election on Saturday. Corbyn swept up about 60 percent of the votes to beat 3 other contenders.

66-year-old Corbyn has pledged to overcome inequality and is opposed to austerity measures. He is also known as an anti-war campaigner.

In his speech, Corbyn said the country needs an economic strategy that reaches out to care for everybody. He said people don't have to be unequal and poverty is not inevitable.

The Labour Party came to power in 1997 after then-Prime Minister Tony Blair steered the party towards the center of politics. The party maintained its position as the ruling party for 13 years until 2010 when the Conservative Party were voted back in.

The Labour Party has been struggling to recover from another heavy defeat in a general election in May.

Analysts say unions and veteran supporters were dissatisfied with the party's policies becoming indistinguishable from those of the Conservatives.

But they also point out there is severe opposition to Corbyn's policy among party supporters and other voters. Some analysts also say Corbyn's anti-war policy may affect Prime Minister David Cameron's hope for bipartisan cooperation in dealing with the civil war in Syria.