Region:
Europe
Category:
Politics
Article type:
Informed

Pollsters were the biggest losers of choice in UK

To the surprise of pollsters and political analysts in the UK, the current prime minister won a large majority and won 330 of the 650 seats in the House of Commons of the Parliament of Westminster

Pre-election polls had predicted Britons a tie in the race for the post of prime minister from David Cameron, the Conservative Party, Ed Miliband, the Labour Party.

But to the surprise of political analysts in the UK, the current prime minister won a large majority and won 330 of the 650 seats in the House of Commons of the Parliament of Westminster, which exceeded the figure also marks the absolute majority needed to govern without the support of other coalitions.

For 23 years no polls failed, in 1992 the opinion polls in the British Isles had won each and every plebiscites and from that moment to date retained their prestige and not missed.

During the five-week campaign, polls gave a slight edge to conservative, and in some cases even predicted a draw with Labour. But the truth is that the Party of Cameron took over 50% of the seats in Parliament.

The first count of votes that made the BBC walk to polling stations gave the game Cameron 316 seats (they managed 330), the Labour Party 238 and the Liberals 10, which caused a shock in analysts in the early hours.

That's why the British media have decided to verify how to present surveys and polls for the forthcoming elections.

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