Region:
America
Category:
Sports

The IBC Rio: the media village of the World Cup

Region:
America
Category:
Sports
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The IBC, which extends over 55,000 m2, operates as a media village, studios, electricity, telecommunications, shops, lounges and restaurants for journalists worldwide

The General Secretary of FIFA, Jerome Valcke, and the Executive Secretary of the Ministry of Sports of Brazil, Luis Fernandes, inaugurated this week the International Broadcast Centre (IBC) for the World Cup Brazil 2014. IBC, located in Riocentro complex of Rio de Janeiro is the nerve center for television production FIFA Brazil 2014 and will provide billions of fans around the planet all the action and excitement of the world's largest single-sport event. More than three billion people watched the coverage of South Africa 2010.

"This is our link with the world," Valcke told reporters at the opening ceremony. "From here, everyone will connect to the World Cup." In this crucial act on the road to the World Cup, Valcke and Fernandes were accompanied by the Governor of the State of Rio de Janeiro, Luiz Fernando Pezão, Mayor of Rio de Janeiro, Eduardo Paes, the Executive Secretary of the Ministry of Communications, Genildo Lins, Director of FIFA TV, Niclas Ericson, and Deputy Local Organizing Committee for the FIFA World Cup 2014, Ricardo Trade Director.

The IBC is the center that helps to make the World Cup a truly global competition. FIFA invest in audiovisual production of the competition to ensure that, throughout, the audience can enjoy the best sports coverage from the latest visual technology to a wide range of multimedia offerings.

In the 64 matches for Brazil 2014, TV production teams of FIFA issued images by IBC, where audiovisual material will be provided to licensees of broadcast rights to FIFA for retransmission in all territories. The creation of the IBC has led to significant improvements in connectivity throughout Brazil in an overall improvement of the infrastructure for the Brazilian economy; including fiber optic links throughout the Amazon region. "This is an important part of the legacy of the World Cup," Fernandes said.

The IBC, which extends over 55,000 m2, operates as a media village, studios, electricity, telecommunications, shops, lounges and restaurants to cater the needs of thousands of workers of broadcasters around the planet. "Thanks to the IBC, Images of World Cup live out half of the world population," noted Fernandes.

On-site there are 17 television studios for licensees of broadcasting rights (MRL) with up to 400 m2, 86 workspaces for MRL, over 100 kilometers of primary and secondary electrical wiring, 350 40-inch HD screens and satellite communications enclosure 6,000 m² in a structure that took five months to assemble. After the final, it will take seven weeks to be dismantling the entire facility.

traslation: Belén Zapata