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Carnival in Rio de Janeiro "não tein" silicones

Region:
America
Category:
Society
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They began the search several months ago and finally achieved the goal, with women of all ages who failed by plastic surgeon, at least to get silicones

At least for a Samba school that looked especially during months dancers with that feature. Their physical attributes, they were their own.

Women wanted for Mocidade Independente Padre Miguel, one of the most famous samba schools of Rio de Janeiro, could not have silicone implants.

They began to search several months ago and finally achieved the goal, with women of all ages who failed by plastic surgeon, at least to get silicones.

In homage to a bygone era, Mocidade looking dancers without breasts or "bumbums" or globular buttocks that dominate the show, a party of one week prior to purge the sins of Catholic ritual of Lent.

"It was not easy," says Paulo Menezes, artistic director of the group, one of the top 12 samba schools parade in Rio Carnival from March 2. "Most women who want to participate in something like an operation have been made."

Brazil a country obsessed with beauty, has one of the highest levels in the world of cosmetic surgery. With two thirds of the population, is just behind the United States in number of plastic surgeons and operations, according to the International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons.

Carnival is also on devices.

The parades at the Sambadrome in Rio de Janeiro, an avenue of 700 meters stands on both sides, are multimillion dollar productions costumes, music and theater. Each samba school is a regiment of dancers, drummers and vedettes. Mocidade, for example, have 4,000 members.

Mocidade natural bodies are seen as a small nod to a trend that has led at least a little Carnival to their roots. Still dominated by broadcast live on television in recent years has seen the Carnival parades resurface street parades and block parties where it all began.

"There is more variety than ever before and a desire for things a little less produced," says Haroldo Costa, a veteran of Carnival and author of a book on the history of the festival. "That's making the most authentic and most popular things."

In Rio de Janeiro, scene of the most famous Brazilian carnival is expected that five million people participate in the festival this year, 20 percent of them tourists. According to authorities, they enter $ 700 billion (420 million euros) to the economy of the city.

traducción: Belén Zapata